IEAGHG Summer School

CPGE Co-hosts 2014 IEAGHG CCS Summer School at The University of Texas at Austin

The Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering is excited to co-host the IEAGHG CCS Summer School at The University of Texas at Austin, July 6-11, 2014. The summer school aims to provide students from diverse academic backgrounds with a broad understanding of the issues surrounding carbon capture and storage, and encourage their active participation in this area. The summer school lasts for one week and includes presentations, hands-on activities and discussion groups led by international experts in the field of CCS. In addition, the students are divided into teams to undertake short research activities on issues of importance within the CCS area, with a presentation to their peers at the end of the week. Time is also allocated for networking and for informal discussions with the assembled experts. Students leaving at the end of the week will have developed a network of contacts in the field of CCS and will have gained a broad overview of the issues surrounding technology development and implementation in CCS.

Local Sponsorship

Each year, approximately 50 to 60 international students attend the IEAGHG CCS Summer School. An important component of the school is to broaden the opportunities for students who might not normally be able to afford a similar educational experience, to attend the summer school. Please consider being a local sponsor.

The Program

Students and Mentors at the 2013 IEAGHG CCS Summer School in Nottingham, England

The summer school program covers every aspect of CCS, blending themes from petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, geosciences, environmental sciences, public policy, legal and regulatory. The program aims to present the most recent information available in each field. The topics covered include:

  • Sources of CO2
  • Capture of CO2
  • Transport of CO2
  • Underground geological storage
  • CO2  Enhanced Oil Recovery
  • Mineral carbonation and industrial uses of CO2
  • Public Acceptance and Outreach
  • Safety
  • Costs and economic potential of CCS
  • Regulatory regimes
  • Implications of CCS for GHG inventories and accounting

Target Students

The target group for the summer school is young scientists, e.g. PhD and MS students and Post Docs with a background in engineering, geo-technologies, socio-economics. Generally some 50-60 students from both developed and developing countries will participate in each program.

Experts

Over 20 experts from industry and research attend the summer school for each program.

The experts are in attendance throughout the week of the summer school. They are there to lead discussion in their areas of expertise and are also available for leading smaller discussion groups on the project topics and other topics of interest to the students – this is a tremendous opportunity to gain from the experience of the assembled experts.

Experts and mentors this year include industry, academic, government and non-governmental organization professionals:

Alstom

Michael Balfe

Aramco Services

Gretchen Gillis

CO2CRC

John Kaldi, University of Adelaide

Denbury Resources

Kyle Beedy

Environmental Defense Fund

Scott Anderson

ExxonMobil (retired)

David Cook

Gassnova

Erik Gjernes

Ghana Government

Joseph Essandoh-Yeddu 

GFZ (Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - German Research Centre for Geosciences)

Jürgen-Friedrich Hake

IEAGHG

Tim Dixon

Samantha Neades

Penn State University

Jim Ladlee, Marcellus Outreach Center

Schlumberger

Andrew Druguid

Lori Gauvreau

David White

Skyonic

Joe Jones

Statoil

Sveinung Hagen

The University of Texas at Austin

Steve Bryant, Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, Cockrell School of Engineering

Hugh Daigle, Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, Cockrell School of Engineering

Thomas Edgar, Energy Institute and Department of Chemical Engineering, Cockrell School of Engineering

Cliff Frohlich, Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences

Gurcan Gulen, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences

Robert Hebner, Center for Electromechanics, Cockrell School of Engineering

Seyyed Hosseini, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences

Sue Hovorka, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences

Charles Jackson, Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences

Cary King, Energy Institute, Jackson School of Geosciences

Tip Meckel, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences

Vanessa Nunez-Lopez, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences

Hilary Olson, Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, Cockrell School of Engineering and Bureau of Economic Geology and Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences

Jon Olson, Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, Cockrell School of Engineering 

Gary Rochelle, Departmet of Chemical Engineering, Cockrell School of Engineering

Katherine Romanak, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences

Becky Smyth, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences

Background

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is now generally seen as a major contributor to reducing emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere. In particular global implementation of CCS could allow large scale reductions of CO2 emissions to be achieved before the end of the next century. Presently, the potential of CCS is being explored in more than 100 projects around the world and international conferences serve as platforms to exchange the results from these activities amongst experts.

For wide scale deployment however, it is necessary to broaden the knowledge base in industrialised and developing countries, particularly at an academic level. Training courses or summer schools are one way of contributing to this, by accelerating and supporting the dissemination of knowledge on the potential for CCS to students around the world.

*photos courtesy of Lori Gauvreau, Schlumberger

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